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Posts Tagged ‘train’

Train travel and Hearing Dogs

Hearing Dogs for Deaf People are working closely with Passenger Focus with the aim of raising awareness about the needs of deaf and disabled people who require assistance when booking train travel. Please take the time to fill in the questionnaire, invite others to take part also.

Once HDfDP have the results it will hopefully strengthen their position when they lobby both the train operating companies and Government, to ensure that the needs of deaf people accompanied by hearing dogs are included, particularly with regards to space for their hearing dog.

If you have any questions, please e-mail Philip at philip.biggs@hearingdogs.org.uk

PhotobucketI’ve had a few problems when travelling by train. This tends to be with other passengers rather than when booking. In my experience,  the train companies are more than happy to give my hearing dog a free ‘seat’ to sit so he is out of the way of other passengers. In practice, this doesn’t always work. My dog is very jumpy and nervous on trains because other people are always stepping on him. On one occasion a couple had jumped on the train in my carriage, and the empty seat next to me being the first one they saw, the man demanded that I get out and give his wife the empty seat. I said no as I had a hearing dog on the floor next to me, tucked out of the way. He grabbed my handbag and my arm, and proceeded to pull me out of my seat. Other passengers started shouting at him to leave me alone. There were plenty of empty seats on the train. My dog was disturbed by the commotion and got out and into the aisle, making it difficult for anyone to go anywhere. The man and his wife did go off to find other seats – without an apology – it was then that I noticed he was wearing a hearing aid. Oh, the irony!

Click on this weblink  www.passengerfocus.org.uk/assistedtravel

If you answer ‘NO’ to question one you will only have access to a limited amount of pages.

Click on the title ‘Passenger Focus Assisted Travel Survey’ in the middle of the page. That will direct you to the homepage of the survey.

For many disabled passengers, the assistance provided by the Assisted Passenger Reservation System (APRS) is crucial in enabling them to travel on the National Rail network. Train companies ask passengers who require assistance to book at least 24 hours in advance using APRS. We would like to know what you think about the service.

Recognising the value and importance of this service to passengers who require assistance to use public transport, Passenger Focus undertakes regular research into the service and we are repeating that work this year.

In addition to this research we have worked with voluntary groups to create a survey which can be used by other organisations. We are supporting organisations who wish to run the survey so that they can get direct feedback from their members. There are just 24 short questions about the service and a space to say more if you choose to. So please take part and tell your friends about the survey too. The Assisted Passenger Reservation Service (APRS) provides vital assistance to disabled people using the national rail network by providing them with a facility to pre-book assistance for their journey.

It takes only a few minutes to do and the closing date is Friday 2 July 2010.

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Train rides

I love travelling and particularly long journeys by train, as mum always makes sure I get a seat by the window. (Not sure my trainers would approve though!) As a working Hearing Dog, I don’t have to pay to travel, so I make the most of this perk. I get a great view, a comfy seat, and mum’s coat to snuggle into. Here I am, on my way to sunny Bournemouth. Train travel rocks!

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Recovery

Mum reports –

Smudge is doing just fine. We saw the vet again this evening and his paw is healing nicely. No foreign objects were found in his paw, the vet thinks it was washed out with all the blood. He’ll wear his collar for a few more days and carry on with the hibiscrub antiseptic and antibiotics.

He had a proper strop with me this morning, though. We got off the train at Waterloo and as soon as we hit the platform, Smudge sat down and refused to move. I took his coat off and he laid down on the ground straight away. Not! Moving! I took his halti off and bribed him with biscuits, but even THAT didn’t work. The last passenger got off the train and stood there laughing at Smudge. Smudge got up and went over to him, wagging his tail. As soon as I spoke to him however, he sat down and refused to move again. So I had to pick him up and carry him to the tube entrance. The little sod! He hates being carried so he did walk when I put him down. It brought back memories of his puppy days, when he tried every trick in the book to do what he wanted to do, not what I wanted to do (such as stay in the park). But he’s a loveable little sod, and it’s so good to see him getting better and becoming his old self again.

Between me and him, I don’t know who’s seen more doctors this week!

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Bl**dy train doors

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Mum got a fright today.

We were on our way home and we got to the train station. The train was sooo crowded, there were so many people that it was hard to get on. I jumped on first then the doors slammed shut behind me, before mum managed to jump on! Mum couldn’t get the doors to open, neither could the other hoomans on the train, and the train pulled out of the station. With me on it. And mum was on the platform. I just stared at mum’s panicky face through the window. I mean, what could I do?

I saw mum run over to the guard. Some nice hooman made sure I got off the train at the next stop and the station manager took me into his warm office. A little while later – oh okay, it was a LONG while later – mum’s white face appeared round the door and she was sooo glad to see me! I was fine, happy as Lassie (I didn’t tell mum someone on the train had been feeding me steaks)

Mum had been very worried. She thought she would never see me again!

She keeps muttering ‘Those stupid f***king train doors! Why don’t they have flashing lights or something??’

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